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Douglass, Frederick (1818-1895) to Mr. Peck

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02990 Author/Creator: Douglass, Frederick (1818-1895) Place Written: Chicago, Illinois Type: Typed letter signed Date: 12 October 1893 Pagination: 1 p. ; 27.7 x 21.2 cm.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02990 Author/Creator: Douglass, Frederick (1818-1895) Place Written: Chicago, Illinois Type: Typed letter signed Date: 12 October 1893 Pagination: 1 p. ; 27.7 x 21.2 cm.

Summary of Content: Typed on stationery of the Exposition Universelle de Chicago, Pavillon Haitien. Sympathizes with Peck, recently removed from a governmental office. Notes that he would have written a letter to the President (Grover Cleveland) on Peck's behalf, but felt he had no influence with the present administration. Remarks, "I do not like to fight, unless I have a hope of hitting somebody. I have no claims on this democratic administration whatever. I did all I could to get it out of power, and do not feel now like begging it to keep my friends in office."

Background Information:

Full Transcript: Exposition Universelle de Chicago,
Pavillon Haitien.
Dictated. Jackson Park, Oct. 12, 1893.
My dear Mr. Peck: -
Pardon delay in answering your letter. I hardly need tell you that I should be ...glad to render you any service within my power. Both yourself and family are very dear to me, and I should be glad to see you retained in your position and every way prosperous. I feel the hardship that is imposed upon you by your removal from office, and the only reason why I did not at once write a letter to the President in your behalf was the moral certainty that I entertain that such a letter, coming from me, with the present administration, would have been utterly useless. I do not like to fight, unless I have a hope of hitting somebody. I have no claims on this democratic administration whatever. I did all I could to get it our of power, and do not feel now like begging it to keep my friends in office. I am sure you will appreciate this reason.
Please remember me kindly to dear Mrs. Peck and the children
Very Truly yours,
Frederick Douglass
See More

People: Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895
Cleveland, Grover, 1837-1908

Historical Era: Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1900

Subjects: African American HistoryExpositions and FairsAfrican American AuthorCaribbeanPresidentLetter of Introduction or RecommendationDemocratic PartyPoliticsGovernment and Civics

Sub Era:

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