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Knox, Henry (1750-1806) to John Doughty

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03502 Author/Creator: Knox, Henry (1750-1806) Place Written: New York, New York Type: Manuscript letter Date: 27 March 1787 Pagination: 2 p. ; 32.4 x 20.3 cm.

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03502 Author/Creator: Knox, Henry (1750-1806) Place Written: New York, New York Type: Manuscript letter Date: 27 March 1787 Pagination: 2 p. ; 32.4 x 20.3 cm.

Summary of Content: Informs Doughty that he will help with procuring subsistence for the troops. Does not believe recruiting service will begin in New York as its quota numbers are deficient. The contracts of Morris and Wadsworth are ending as Congress is not happy with the proposals. Agrees with Doughty, who is in favor of a "national force," as he expects "every evil that can be produced from Anarchy." Also notes that "Congress have had but for a very little time nine States. Therefore nothing has been concluded on respecting higher pay for the Artillery than the Infantry." Mentions supplying artillery pieces and stores necessary for the western country and states he will have to submit estimates to the Board of Treasury, as "they hold the purse strings." Ends by stating, "The disturbances in Massachusetts have pretty nearly subsided - the Courts of Justice are now trying such of the captured culprits as appear to be most criminal," referring to the end of Shays' Rebellion. Noted as a copy and lacks a signature. Creator inferred as Henry Knox, given the content. In the hand of William Knox.

Full Transcript: [draft]
(Copy) New York 27th march 1787
My dear Sir
I received your favor of the 25th instant by Mr. Forde,
I shall do every thing in my power not only ...to procure the subsistence, to the last of this month inclusively, but some pay in order to be forwarded by you.
But at the same time I ought not to flatter you with more than will be accomplished the subsistence I hope will be furnished.
As to the recruiting service I do not believe it will be commenced in New York, for its numbers of the quota deficient.
Morris & Wadsworth [inserted: contracts] are I believe at an end - Congress do not seem to like the proposals as far as I can understand their sentiments.
Your reasonings on the want of a national force are perfectly correspondent with my own, I expect every evil that can be produced from Anarchy.
If there should be any deductions I shall endeavor that your Majority be secured to you.
Congress have had but for a very little time nine States. Therefore nothing has been [2] concluded on respecting higher pay for the Artillery than the Infantry.
You will probably be in this City a sufficient time previous to your departure in order to consult on the stores essentially necessary for the western country, when I will decide on the number of pieces of Artillery and Stores which shall be forwarded - I mean for which I shall make estimates to be Board of treasury - they hold the purse strings.
The disturbances in Massachusetts have pretty nearly subsided - the Courts of Justice are now trying such of the captured culprits as appear to be most criminal.
I am
My dear Sir &c
Major Doughty.
See More

People: Doughty, John, 1754-1826
Knox, Henry, 1750-1806

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: Revolutionary War GeneralMilitary HistoryMilitary ProvisionsSoldier's PayFinanceRecruitmentContinental CongressCongressStanding ArmyArtilleryInfantryMilitary SuppliesFrontiers and ExplorationWestward ExpansionRebellionMobs and RiotsShays' RebellionLand TransactionCriminals and OutlawsContract

Sub Era: Creating a New Government

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