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Washington, George (1732-1799) Inaugural address [leaf from 1st draft of discarded first inaugural = pp.57-58]

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC01589 Author/Creator: Washington, George (1732-1799) Place Written: [New York] Type: Autograph manuscript Date: [1789/04] Pagination: 2 p. = "57-58" 23 x 18 cm

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Summary of Content: Concerning trade and population growth, with allusion to the postal service, newspapers and manufactures. This was a first draft which Washington later discarded. The manuscript was disassembled by Jared Sparks (whose unsigned autograph note "handwriting of Washington" appears in the margin) and leaves or clippings were given away as samples of GW's handwriting. Sparks regarded the document as unimportant since Washington had not actually used this draft. See also GLC# 639.25 and 4443.01.

Background Information: Signer of the U.S. Constitution.

Full Transcript: …of the soil and Sea, for the wares and merchandize of other Nations is open to all.__ Notwithstanding the embarassments under which our trade has hitherto laboured, since the peace, ...the enterprising spirit of our citizens has steered our Vessels to almost every region of the known world.__ In some distant & heretofore unfrequented countries, our new Constellation has been received with tokens of uncommon regard.__ An energetic government will give to our flag still greater respect: While a sense of reciprocal benefits will serve to connect us with the rest of mankind in stricter ties of amity.__ But an internal commerce is more in our power; and may be of more importance.__ The surplus of produce in one part of the United States, will, in many instances, be wanted in another.__ An intercourse of this kind is well calculated to multiply Sailors, exterminate prejudices, diffuse blessings, and encrease the friendship of the inhabitants of one State for those of another.__ While [2] the individual States shall be occupied in facilitating the means of transportation, by opening canals & improving roads: you will not forget that the purposes of business & Society may be vastly promoted by giving cheapness, dispatch & security to communications through the regular Posts.__ I need not say how satisfactory it would be, to gratify the useful curiosity of our citizens by the conveyance of News Papers & periodical Publications in the public vehicles without expence.__
Notwithstanding the rapid growth of our population, from the facility of obtaining subsistence, as well as from the accession of strangers, yet we shall not soon become a manufacturing people.__ Because men are even better pleased with labouring on their farms, than in their workshops.__ Even the mechanics who come from Europe, as soon as they can procure a little land of their own, commonly turn Cultivators.__ Hence it will be found more beneficial, I believe, to continue to exchange…

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People: Washington, George, 1732-1799

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: PresidentPresidential Speeches and ProclamationsInaugural AddressGovernment and CivicsCommerceMerchants and TradePost OfficeIndustryEconomicsFinanceJournalismCensus

Sub Era: The Early Republic

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